Compassionate, informed advice about healthcare decision making

Posts Tagged ‘hospice’

“You can flunk out of hospice.”

Posted by

I am the last person they want to meet. Actually, they would rather not meet me any time. Hospice chaplain.

I remember walking into a nursing home room to meet a new hospice patient. He was in his 60s and had a brain tumor. I gave him a friendly smile and said, “I’m Hank, the chaplain from hospice.”

With a terrified look he gasped, “Oh God. No!”

I sat down and asked, “What do you mean by that?”

“I don’t want to die.” A very honest and understandable answer.

He was so disturbed by my presence I decided to spend this first visit just getting acquainted and, perhaps, lower his anxiety a little. I told him just because you are in hospice you don’t have to die. I said, “You can flunk out of hospice.” It doesn’t happen often but occasionally people actually improve and no longer have a life expectancy of six months or less, which is the prognosis needed to qualify for hospice care.

It is very normal to fear death

Sadly, “I don’t want to die,” were among the last words I heard him say. I made several more visits to see him but the tumor creeping through his brain took away his ability to speak after that initial conversation. I so wanted to explore what was behind his fear of death. It is very normal to fear death but each patient has their own unique spin on it.

There are many obstacles hindering people from getting into hospice care but I think getting over our normal resistance to accepting a terminal diagnosis is a major hurdle. Here is how the logic goes … “Hospice means I am dying. … I don’t want to die. … Therefore, I won’t go into hospice and not die.” Truth is most people die outside of hospice care anyway so staying away from hospice does not keep one alive.

They are going to die with or without hospice

I was inspired to write about admission into hospice because a recent issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has a “Patient Page” on the topic. JAMA is mostly for physicians and other healthcare professionals but they offer “patient pages” as a resource for lay persons. You can download a one page summary about hospice free from their website.

I advise medical personnel outside of hospice to emphasize the positive aspects of hospice as they counsel patients about end-of-life care. Hospice can help people stay in their own home and provide help for the caregivers. Medical equipment and many other expenses are covered under hospice. You have pain control experts available to offer comfort. Emotional and spiritual concerns are addressed with social workers and chaplains.

Sure. The patient is seriously ill and will probably die in the near future. But they are going to do that with or without hospice.

Illustration by Maria Fabrizio

Hospice Care Too Long?

Posted by

Is hospice care costing our nation too much because some providers are caring for patients who are not terminally ill?

That is the question addressed in research conducted by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the New York Times and published in the June 28,, 2011 edition of the Times. Hospice programs are reimbursed by Medicare a set amount each day they care for a patient. The amount depends on services required for the average patient with a particular terminal condition. For a patient to qualify for hospice care a physician has to certify that, in all likelihood, the patient will probably die in six months or less. If the patient is still alive after six months then the physician can recertify that six-month or less prognosis.

People staying too long in hospice care? The average length of stay in hospice care from admission until death is 17 days. That means when you add the number of total days Medicare pays for and divide by the number of patients receiving hospice care the average is 17 days. Whether or not hospice providers are taking advantage of the system by seeking out patients who will likely live longer is a question beyond my expertise.

Seventeen days is not a long time

My interest in this study is what is implied about the other end of this equation. With the average stay in hospice of 17 days and if some patients are inappropriate because they are likely to live beyond the six-month prognosis, then there are a heck of a lot patients who are “too-short-stay.” Seventeen days is not a long time when the original intent of the hospice Medicare benefit was to provide quality end-of-life care in the last six months of life.

The short-stay patients (one to three days, for example) are the hardest to give the highest quality care. These patients obviously have very advanced diseases and either the patient, family, or physician waited until the last minute to opt for hospice care. So you have a patient and family with the greatest need and only a day or two for the hospice to provide for their needs.

Turns out, it actually is very expensive for a hospice to get all the services in place. Without going into the details too much, a lot of staff time is needed to admit a new hospice patient such as setting up medical equipment in the home, buying medications, completing paperwork, and other administrative costs. But the hospice is reimbursed at the daily rate that is much less than what they actually have to spend. They lose money on these short-stay patients. They are glad to provide this service and can do it because they know other patients will be in the program longer and thus they can recover some of those costs.

These late-referrals have great physical, emotional, and spiritual needs.

These late-referral patients and their families have great physical, emotional, and spiritual needs. Dying three days after admission means, most likely, they just accepted the terminal condition of the patient. Perhaps they were in denial and hoping for a cure. Their hopes have been dashed and the patient is in the most frail condition. They look to hospice to “make it better.” Not provide a cure, but to make the death as peaceful and pain-free as possible.

My experience, which makes this purely anecdotal, is that occasionally hospices are unable to provide the quality care just because of the press of time. Perhaps, they couldn’t get the pain under control immediately or emotional and spiritual needs were left unmet. So, at times, you have an angry family because their and the patient’s needs were not met. From the hospice program’s viewpoint it was impossible to provide for these needs on such short notice. And the hospice makes the least amount of money from these patients. I have a theorem for this situation. It goes like this:

“The amount of anger and hostility of a family directed toward hospice is inversely proportional to the amount of financial reimbursement the hospice receives.”

Yes, perhaps some patients are staying in hospice care too long. I will leave that for others to sort out. But I know far too many are not in hospice care long enough. I am not sure how we get individual patients and families to seek hospice care sooner. Generally, our health care system focuses on cure (most often appropriately) rather than comfort and quality of life.

My wish would be that people would make that switch sooner from cure to comfort care only.

Feeling Guilty Over NOT Inserting a Feeding Tube? Please Don’t

Posted by

Is failing to put a feeding tube in a dying Alzheimer’s patient starving her to death?

The short answer is no.

That basically was the question posed to me by the daughter of one such patient two months ago. Her mother had died four weeks earlier. She had read my book Hard Choices for Loving People for the first time seven years ago. That was four years after her mom had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. So, for eleven years her mother was on that long, slow decline toward her final days. Her death came after a stay in the hospital when the family agreed with the physician’s recommendation to provide comfort care only and not insert a feeding tube.

In the months leading up to the hospitalization this daughter spent five to six hours every day at the nursing home helping with her mother’s care. Most telling for me, it sometimes took two hours to feed her mother. This is so common for the end of dementia patients like this mother. They choke and cough in an effort to clear their airway. Occasionally, these eating difficulties lead to pneumonia. Finally, these patients just lose the ability to swallow.

As difficult as it can be, studies have shown that these hard-to-feed patients can be successfully and safely fed. Even so, when all efforts at careful hand feeding fail, it is a sign that the last days of a patient’s life have arrived.

Feeding tubes do not add one day to the patients lifespan

The daughter went on in her e-mail to me: “Since that time [of her death], I have felt extremely guilty. All my sisters still feel we did the right thing by following the wishes Mama expressed in her living will, but I struggled, and still struggle, as the living will she signed was 14 years ago. Mama may not have lived very long if she had a feeding tube but, then again, it may have given her years of life since I was with her so much of the time to ensure she got good care.”

I know this is hard but the research is clear. Feeding tubes do not add one day to the lifespan of advanced dementia patients like this mother. From all I can tell from this correspondence this patient did get good care. Comfort care, palliative care, and hospice care are quite appropriate for advanced dementia patients. Give them ice chips or sponge swabs dipped in water to quench their thirst. Give them a loving touch and spiritual support. There are a great many measures we can do to ease the suffering of an Alzheimer’s patient’s last days. Inserting a feeding tube is not one of them.

Photo by Ben White, Unsplash 

Quality of Life Publishing Logo

Quality of Life Publishing Co. is the proud publisher of Hank’s books, as well as other branded educational materials for health care & end-of-life care.

www.QOLpublishing.com

Copyright 2020, Hank Dunn. All rights reserved. Website design by Brian Joseph Studios

Volume Discounts for Branded Book Orders

Minimum quantity for branded books is 100. English and Spanish branded books are sold separately. Click here for more information or contact us with questions.

Black

  • 100 to 249 copies: $3.97 each
  • 250 to 499 copies: $2.81 each
  • 500 to 999 copies: $2.21 each
  • 1000 to 1499 copies: $1.66 each
  • 1500 to 1999 copies: $1.40 each
  • 2000 to 3999 copies: $1.27 each
  • 4000+ copies: $1.08 each

Color

  • 100 to 249 copies: $6.62 each
  • 250 to 499 copies: $3.92 each
  • 500 to 999 copies: $2.76 each
  • 1000 to 1499 copies: $1.93 each
  • 1500 to 1999 copies: $1.58 each
  • 2000 to 3999 copies: $1.41 each
  • 4000+ copies: $1.14 each

Volume Discounts for Unbranded Book Orders

Discounts apply to the total books ordered of all titles. Mix and match to get quantity discounts on unbranded books.

  • 1 to 9 copies: $7.35 each
  • 10 to 24 copies: $5.13 each
  • 25 to 49 copies: $4.24 each
  • 50 to 99 copies: $3.75 each
  • 100 to 249 copies: $2.87 each
  • 250 to 499 copies: $2.37 each
  • 500 to 999 copies: $1.98 each
  • 1000 to 1499 copies: $1.54 each
  • 1500 to 1999 copies: $1.32 each
  • 2000 to 3999 copies: $1.21 each
  • 4000+ copies: $1.05 each
There are no products